Ground-Breaking Experiments

How Reliable is Your Memory?

Posted by on Dec 3, 2016 in Featured, Ground-Breaking Experiments | 0 comments

How Reliable is Your Memory?

Loftus and Palmer conducted an experiment in 1974 entitled, “Reconstruction of Automobile Destruction: An Example of the Interaction between Language and Memory.” They wanted to investigate how memories of an event were affected by information gained after the event took place. Loftus and Palmer conducted two experiments both of which will be outlined below.   Experiment #1:   Forty five American students consisted of the sample for the first experiment. There were five conditions. Each participant was placed in one condition. They all watched seven films of traffic accidents...

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The Strange Situation

Posted by on Jun 23, 2015 in Featured, Ground-Breaking Experiments | 0 comments

The Strange Situation

Mary Ainsworth was a pioneer in research into early attachment theory. She became famous for her assessment technique in identifying different attachment styles in infants. Her technique was the Strange Situation.   The Strange Situation involved approximately 100 middle class American mothers and infants. The infant’s ages ranged between 12 and 18 months. The experiment was set up in a playroom with one way glass in order for the researchers to observe what was happening. The assessment involved eight different steps: The experimenter, mother, and baby are in the room together The...

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Bandura’s Bobo Doll Experiment

Posted by on Jun 16, 2014 in Featured, Ground-Breaking Experiments | 5 comments

Bandura’s Bobo Doll Experiment

The famous Bobo Doll experiment conducted by Albert Bandura in 1961 is still widely cited and highly relevant today. It lends support to Bandura’s social learning theory which claims that learning occurs through observation and imitation of others behaviours. It could have widespread implications regarding the effects of the media. If celebrities are seen as role models, this could lead to many dangerous behaviours being imitated, such as extreme diets, drugs, hard-core partying and even violence. Since magazines and television like to report scandalous conduct, this could affect the way...

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Solomon Asch’s Experiment on Conformity

Posted by on Aug 28, 2013 in Featured, Solomon Asch's Conformity Experiment | 1 comment

Solomon Asch’s Experiment on Conformity

Solomon Asch, an American psychologist, conducted what is now considered a classic experiment in social psychology about conformity.   Asch told the participants that the purpose of the experiment was to test one’s visual abilities. The real purpose was to test levels of conformity in group situations. There was a group of eight participants in each trial; however, seven of these were confederates, meaning that they knew the real purpose of the experiment but they pretended to be participants. The group was then given two images. One was an image of three lines of varying length and...

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How obedient would you be?

Posted by on May 28, 2013 in Featured, Stanley Milgram's Obedience Experiment | 0 comments

How obedient would you be?

Stanley Milgram, a famous psychologist at Yale University, conducted experiments on obedience in the 1960’s. Milgram was interested to understand the excuses the Nazi’s gave at the Nuremberg trials. When asked why they committed such horrendous crimes against humanity, many claimed to be “just following orders.” Milgram was curious to know if there was something inherent in the German psyche that made them very obedient or if we all would behave the same way given the pressure to obey authority.   In order to test his theory, Milgram sent out an advertisement for male...

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Stanford Prison Experiment

Posted by on May 19, 2013 in Featured, Philip Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment | 0 comments

Stanford Prison Experiment

Imagine being harassed, humiliated and dehumanized daily. Imagine the screeching sound of a whistle piercing your ears at 2:30 am, forcing you up and out of bed. Imagine your name and identity being stripped from you to be replaced by a cold, unfeeling number. Imagine there’s no way out. Now imagine you signed up for this.   The famous Stanford prison experiment was conducted by Dr. Zimbardo in 1971. Little did he know what he had unleashed when he designed the study. Curious to answer the question, what happens to good people when put in evil places, he decided to simulate a prison...

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